Browsing "technology"

And the Lights Went Out, All Over the ‘Net.

This is fiction. Maybe:

“This morning, people around the world are waking up to a new internet.  A different internet. An internet where we at last can reap the benefits of the diligence, expertise, and forethought of our benevolent leaders who, guided by the selfless work of the great media engine and those in power over it, saw with crystal clarity the need for a strong response to the insipid cancer that is intellectual property piracy. No longer will the hard-working creatives who produce the great works of art and information be trodden underfoot by the lowlife, belly-crawling, bottom-feeding thieving scum that are everywhere, into everything, and beholding to nobody. Today, we take back what is rightfully ours. A clean internet. A pure internet. A safe internet…”

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Jul 6, 2011 - technology    No Comments

Say Cheese+

Listening to TWiT 308, and everyone fawning over Google+. Some interesting points come out of the discussion, the biggest one being that perhaps what’s so cool about Google+ right now is that the only people on it are the tech elite, and that things will change once it “opens up” to the rest of the world. Nice. A bunch of self-important “experts” bragging about what they have that everyone else doesn’t.

The whole magpie (Google-pie?) convention reminded me of a sequence from Firesign Theater‘s album “Give Me Immortality or Give Me Death“:  as Princess Goddess speeds away in her stretch dumpster, Danny Vanilla (celebrity stalker) says:

“… celebrazzis taking pictures of themselves …”

It seems to fit.

 

Aug 20, 2008 - politics, technology    No Comments

Net Neuter-ality

In the emotional whirlwind which is our current political campaign cycle, there are many issues that wax and wane with the tide of public opinion.  “Net neutrality” has been on the waning side (haven’t heard much about it recently) and, because of that, I’ve not paid much attention.

Lawrence Lessig, on the other hand, has been watching and he’s summed up his perspective on John McCain’s technology policy brilliantly in this video.

Isn’t it curious how the Republicans always serve up geriatric candidates with archaic stances on evolution, while Democrats serve up youthful alternatives interested in changing the world?  Now, before you go off whining about one party or the other, I’m not loyal to either of them as I think both have faults.  Yes, both parties are generational, both have good basic principals.  The problem is neither follow them, though that’s as much the fault of the populace as anything else.

But, I digress.  Check out Lessig’s video and draw your own conclusions.  As for me:

John McCain:  EPIC FAIL

Barack Obama:  Verdict still out

Things that make you go "WTF?"

There was a little buzz among bloggers, kicked off this week by Podnosh (and picked up by Bad Science) around a report published by the Charity Commission stating that (to paraphrase) “wikis and blogs have no educational value”.  I’m not going to go into a detailed stance here (I’ll let the discussion on Podnosh and Bad Science do that for me, they’re doing a wonderful job), but I am going to make one observation:  What does this mean for the BBC? Let me explain.

If you take a look at who makes up the Charity Commission, you’ll find Sharmila Nebhrajani is one of the commissioners.  Sharmila is also COO of BBC Future Media & Technology, and this is where I get confused.  The commission has a member who runs the BBC department that handles its digital content, website, and (I would assume) blogs and podcasts.  The commission doesn’t see blogs as educational, yet the BBC continues to support Sharmila’s department in spite of a £36 million overspend.

Did I forget to mention that Sharmila also has a Facebook account?

Does this strike anyone as mildly … well … odd?

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